Posted in Classroom Examples, Genius Hour, Why Unlearn?

I feel so out of control, but it is so worth it.

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There have been amazing things happening in my passion project based classroom, but there are also things that don’t go so well.   As the teacher / facilitator of a project based classroom I constantly struggle to feel like I have control of my classroom. Everyday I feel pulled in so many directions.  My students fill out proposals that have completion dates, we file them away in their individual files and we input them into a database that connects to a calendar and I feel like I have finally found a system that will allow me to keep track of all the projects.  However, I still go home feeling like I have failed somehow or someone. Every period I am on, I try to talk to those who are working on projects and need support, I try to talk to those who are finished their projects and are reflecting and negotiating points, I try to talk to the ones who are brainstorming their next project and I try to talk to the ones that need some motivation.  At the end of day I am exhausted and feel that I haven’t done enough to get to everyone. I feel teacher guilt that some students weren’t working on anything. It is hard when you don’t see or are not able to manage all the behind the scenes.

Feeling out of control sucks, but I have to continue to remind myself that it is important that I don’t talk to all students all the time.  The whole point of a student lead class is to teach them to become more independent. I want them to learn to manage their time. I want them to fail (so that they can learn from it), and I want to provide a safe place for them to do this.  I have to remind myself that they get out of it what they put into it.

When I am feeling out of control I check out their twitter feeds, vlogs, blogs and podcasts and I am usually blown away with what I never knew they were working on. These updates are crucial to a project based classroom.  It is from these posts that I usually find out that they have done way more than I thought they had.  It is at this point that I talk myself through my feelings of inadequacy, guilt and lack of control and am reminded that it is all worth it.  You can check out some of the things that make it worth it in my previous post PBL in Action or below.  You can also follow along with us @ #jmsshpa11 #jmsshpahhg #jmsshpacgw on twitter.

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For anyone thinking about trying this out you need to be prepared to be uncomfortable, it sucks but it is so worth it.

Thanks for unlearning with us 🙂

Cheers, R

Posted in Classroom Examples, Genius Hour

PBL in Action

Over the next few weeks my hope is to share some of my students projects with you.  I will share the good, the bad and the ugly.  If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at any point throughout 🙂

Puzzle Masters 5K Family Walk & Run in support of Autism and Children at Risk

Last weekend I got to take part in one of the student lead projects as a volunteer.  I supported these students for the last month and half by asking questions, providing some suggestions and helping them connect with people when they needed an adult.  In their class there are approximately 10 groups working on projects as well. This means that over the last month and a half the received 10 % of my attention and that was it.  In a month and half three grade 11 students organized a 5K race to raise money and awareness for Autism. Check out the video below to get an overview of the day. It was amazing.

 

Dany K Kutz for Kids, Healthy Lifestyle and Peer Mentoring

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With his permission I’d like to introduce you to Dany.  I have taught Dany for the last three years and finally this year he had his aha moment.  He and his partners have taken things that they are interested in outside of school and have brought it to the classroom. He is in two of my classes and currently has three projects on the go.  

Dany cuts his friends hair at home for $, he is cutting hair at school for $10 a cut with all proceeds going to Jumpstart Canada.

Dany loves working out and talking nutrition. He has started an Instagram account with his partner and they are motivating their followers to be active and to eat right.

Dany is Lebanese and can speak Arabic.  When he was in grade 10 we worked with a group of students who were newcomers to Canada (many who speak Arabic).  Dany really enjoyed working with them. Dany reached out to the teacher that we had worked with and is now volunteering in her class once or twice a week.  

This is what Dany has to say about what he has been doing.

 

Thanks for unlearning with us 🙂  

Cheers, R

Posted in Student Perspective, Why Unlearn?

What are the roles of teachers and students in an inquiry classroom?

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I am currently taking a course where we were asked to define the roles of the teacher and students in an inquiry based classroom…..so I thought I might write a quick post about it.  

Teachers Role

As more and more classrooms are shifting from teacher lead lessons to a more student centred student lead approach, it is evident that the roles of both teacher and student will need to change.  The “sage on the stage” or teacher knows best model is no longer relevant in our ever changing world. By no means does that mean that the teacher no longer has control over what is happening, it is that the teacher is no longer the keeper of all knowledge, as we now have access to anything and everything at our fingertips.  In this type of classroom the teacher needs to learn to let go and become a facilitator / mentor to their students. Teachers need to become the CEO of their classroom with many projects happening under them. In my opinion, in an inquiry classroom a teacher’s role is to:

  • Take Risks – be ok with failure.
  • Expose students to new ideas and issues that are in our world.
  • Provide opportunities for their students outside of the classroom.
  • Help ignite passion within their students.
  • Support their students in finding ways to explore those passions.
  • Help their students learn where and how to find credible information.
  • Support students on learning time management skills.
  • Connect curriculum to their passion projects.
  • Connect students to experts and community members that can support their projects.
  • Model the love of learning and promote lifelong learning.
  • Advocate on behalf of your students.
  • Help students reflect on their learning – what worked, what didn’t and what will you do differently next time?

Students Role

I have slowly moved from a teacher centred classroom, to a teacher / student centred classroom, to a complete student centred passion based classroom over the past 5 years or so.  My grade 12s have been a part of this for the last three years. When trying to think about what the role of the student is, I thought who better to ask then them.  This is what they had to say.

“In your classroom failure is okay and we are allowed to fail and it won’t be a bad thing or effect our marks. It is actually a good thing in this class. We are allowed to talk through all sorts of issues we have in the classroom to figure them out. It’s like everyone is apart of your project and contributes to it even though is just your project. We all like to see each other succeed. We also are allowed to use our phones and computers pretty much all the time without getting in trouble.”

“What became evident in your classroom is that it wasn’t a regular learning system that people have been used to for the last 10 years. We are allowed and encouraged to  delve in to our own minds and reveal are true passions. From there we are granted access to further research upon what we are passionate about in the inquiry process. We are also expected to do more self-directed learning as opposed to the traditional standards of memorize what the teacher says and study for the test. So our role is to become the guide to our own studying. We are encouraged to go on our phones and use twitter and other media devices to help enhance our learning. Whereas, in most traditional classrooms the only time you would be allowed to take out a media device is your computer when taking notes. We are still expected to work hard in both types of classrooms but we are allowed to fail in yours and make mistakes without getting a failing mark. We are also encouraged to talk about our failures over the course and reflect on them (in your classroom), as opposed to failing on a test and never looking at it again and missing that learning opportunity.”

“I find that I can help some less experienced students and I’m able to think bigger when it comes to things that I can do for school work.  We’ve been planning out our project, getting in contact with Parkdale Food Center, and I help other students figure out issues that they want to look at.”

So what I get from these students is that their roles are to:

  • Think big and figure out what they are passionate about.
  • Have an open mind.
  • Take Risks – don’t be afraid to fail.
  • Think creatively.
  • Support one another in their learning.
  • Guide their own learning.
  • Be more self directed.
  • Learn to time manage.
  • Use non traditional ways of researching.
  • Connect with community.
  • Reflect on their learning and learn from successes and failures.

 

If you look at the two lists they are quite similar.  Both teacher and student need to have an open mind, not be afraid of taking risks and failing and to support each other in their learning.

I feel as though I have left a few things out – I would love to add to these lists for future discussions.  Please let me know your thoughts.

Thanks for unlearning with us 🙂

R